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Tom Goldman

Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and on NPR.org.

With a beat covering the entire world of professional sports, both in and outside of the United States, Goldman reporting covers the broad spectrum of athletics from the people to the business of athletics.

During his nearly 30 years with NPR, Goldman has covered every major athletic competition including the Super Bowl, the World Series, the NBA Finals, golf and tennis championships, and the Olympic Games.

His pieces are diverse and include both perspective and context. Goldman often explores people's motivations for doing what they do, whether it's solo sailing around the world or pursuing a gold medal. In his reporting, Goldman searches for the stories about the inspirational and relatable amateur and professional athletes.

Goldman contributed to NPR's 2009 Edward R. Murrow award for his coverage of the 2008 Beijing Olympics and to a 2010 Murrow Award for contribution to a series on high school football, "Friday Night Lives." Earlier in his career, Goldman's piece about Native American basketball players earned a 2004 Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award from the Center for the Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University and a 2004 Unity Award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association.

In January 1990, Goldman came to NPR to work as an associate producer for sports with Morning Edition. For the next seven years he reported, edited, and produced stories and programs. In June 1997, he became NPR's first full-time sports correspondent.

For five years before NPR, Goldman worked as a news reporter and then news director in local public radio. In 1984, he spent a year living on an Israeli kibbutz. Two years prior he took his first professional job in radio in Anchorage, Alaska, at the Alaska Public Radio Network.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

A MARTINEZ, HOST:

TOKYO — They were called the "COVID Olympics." The "pandemic Olympics." The "anger Olympics." Many Japanese people were upset to host such a huge and risky event in the middle of the pandemic, and many outside observers were surprised it happened at all.

TOKYO — An American teenager has made history at the Tokyo Summer Olympics. Nevin Harrison, 19, became the first female athlete from the U.S. to win a gold medal in the sport of canoe sprint.

By winning a new event, the women's 200-meter canoe single, Harrison not only became the first U.S. woman to claim gold, but Games statisticians say she's only the third female teenager to win an Olympic canoe sprint race. Harrison beat her one-time idol and now rival, Canadian Laurence Vincent-Lapointe, who has won multiple world championships and took silver in the 200 meters.

TOKYO — Ryan Crouser of the USA is golden again. He repeated as Olympic champion in the men's shot put equaling what he did in the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games. He also set an Olympic record in the process. Not once. Not twice. But three times.

On a sweltering day at the Olympic stadium, the big man put on a big performance. The 6-foot-7 inch, 320-pound Crouser broke the Olympic record three times in his six throws. And he saved the best for last.

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