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Susan Davis

Susan Davis is a congressional correspondent for NPR and a co-host of the NPR Politics Podcast. She has covered Congress, elections, and national politics since 2002 for publications including USA TODAY, The Wall Street Journal, National Journal and Roll Call. She appears regularly on television and radio outlets to discuss congressional and national politics, and she is a contributor on PBS's Washington Week with Robert Costa. She is a graduate of American University in Washington, D.C., and a Philadelphia native.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Three hours and 19 minutes - that is how long it took for D.C. National Guard troops to receive authorization to respond to a frantic call for help from the Capitol Police during the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Meanwhile, those guard troops were sitting just minutes away from the building under siege. A joint Senate panel heard testimony today from military and national security officials to try to understand why it took so long for help to arrive. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis covered the hearings. She's here now.

When Congress reconvened the night of the Jan. 6 riot to finish certifying the electoral college results, Rep. Rodney Davis, R-Ill., huddled with top Democrats on the House floor.

"I was on the dais with the [Speaker Pelosi], and the speaker and I, and also [House Administration Chair Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif.], had a conversation about a bipartisan approach and a bipartisan commission, or a bicameral commission, to move things forward to find out what went wrong," he told NPR. "Unfortunately that bipartisan discussion didn't last too long."

The House is on track to pass a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package, which includes another stimulus check to millions of Americans, additional unemployment benefits, and new child tax credits.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Hour after hour, in testimony that was sometimes dense, senators and witnesses discussed everything from protective gear for officers to communications between law enforcement agencies to what can be done to prevent future attacks.

Shortly after Election Day last year, veteran Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York joined three newly elected House Democrats in their call for incoming President Biden to use his executive authority to cancel up to $50,000 in student loan debt.

"I have spoken to him. I have told him how important it is. He is considering it," Schumer said at a New York press conference with then-Reps.-elect Mondaire Jones, Ritchie Torres and Jamaal Bowman. Months earlier, Schumer had backed Bowman's primary opponent, longtime incumbent Rep. Eliot Engel.

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