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All Things Considered

Mon-Fri at 4:00 PM
  • Hosted by Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly, Ari Shapiro

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly, and Ari Shapiro. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

New and used cars are getting more expensive, so is the gasoline that powers them. And when you pull up to a drive-through, you can expect to pay, yes, more for your burger or burrito. Prices are climbing for all kinds of things as the U.S. rebounds from the pandemic recession. But so far, sticker shock is not stopping buyers, as NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

The company behind the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline said Wednesday it's officially terminating the project. TC Energy already had suspended construction in January when President Biden revoked a key cross-border presidential permit.

Like a lot of us, Amtrak had a rough 2020. Ridership fell nearly half from the prior year.

But with the worst of the pandemic seemingly in the past, Amtrak doesn't just want to get back to where it was before the recession – chugging along, slowly adding new riders for a few decades. It wants Americans to fall back in love with trains.

Amtrak's planning on adding 39 new routes across the country and boosting service on lines that already exist. It's setting a goal of 20 million more customers each year – a 60% jump from its pre-pandemic high.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

New and used cars are getting more expensive, so is the gasoline that powers them. And when you pull up to a drive-through, you can expect to pay, yes, more for your burger or burrito. Prices are climbing for all kinds of things as the U.S. rebounds from the pandemic recession. But so far, sticker shock is not stopping buyers, as NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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