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Hannah Hagemann

Hannah Hagemann is a 2019 Kroc Fellow. During her fellowship, she will work at NPR's National Desk and Weekend Edition.

She comes to NPR from the Bay Area, where she earned a master's in science journalism from UC Santa Cruz and reported for KQED Public Radio in San Francisco.

In July 2019, Hannah was one of the first reporters on the ground covering the mass shooting in Gilroy, California. Hagemann enjoys reporting stories at the intersection of community, policy and science. She has reported on climate change, fishing issues and PFAS chemicals.

Before beginning a career in journalism, Hagemann worked as a geologist. She sampled and cleaned up industrial pollution across California with drill crews, railroad foremen and high-level regulators. The work brought Hagemann to remote corners of the Mojave and sprawling air force bases, but most often she was investigating contamination in working-class communities across Los Angeles.

In her free time, Hagemann enjoys hiking, skiing, mountain biking and seeing live bluegrass and funk music. She also paints landscapes and writes poetry.

In March, as states across the country began implementing stay-at-home orders and commuters got off the road, traffic dropped, but a new National Safety Council report finds that the number of motor vehicle fatalities per miles driven increased by 14% compared with the March 2019 rate.

On Monday, California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced during his daily coronavirus press briefing an updated set of public health benchmarks that counties must meet to move further into reopening their economies.

These more permissive thresholds could allow 53 of the state's 58 counties to reopen more parts of the economy, he said, speaking to reporters at a Napa Valley restaurant.

Congressional Democrats announced Saturday they're requesting all records and documents regarding President Trump's decision to fire State Department Inspector General Steve Linick, the fourth government watchdog Trump has fired or sought to remove in the last six weeks.

Eighteen of California's 58 counties have received state approval to further ease coronavirus restrictions, but major population centers such as the San Francisco Bay Area are choosing not to relax stay-at-home orders for now.

Wisconsin's Supreme Court has overturned the state's "Safer at Home" orders and mandated that all future statewide restrictions to battle the coronavirus must be approved by the legislature's rule-making committee before they could be implemented.

The court ruled to strike down the orders 4-3 on Wednesday, with conservative Justice Brian Hagedorn dissenting.

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