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Bobby Allyn

Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco. He covers technology and how Silicon Valley's largest companies are transforming how we live and reshaping society.

He came to San Francisco from Washington, where he focused on national breaking news and politics. Before that, he covered criminal justice at member station WHYY.

In that role, he focused on major corruption trials, law enforcement, and local criminal justice policy. He helped lead NPR's reporting of Bill Cosby's two criminal trials. He was a guest on Fresh Air after breaking a major story about the nation's first supervised injection site plan in Philadelphia. In between daily stories, he has worked on several investigative projects, including a story that exposed how the federal government was quietly hiring debt collection law firms to target the homes of student borrowers who had defaulted on their loans. Allyn also strayed from his beat to cover Philly parking disputes that divided in the city, the last meal at one of the city's last all-night diners, and a remembrance of the man who wrote the Mister Softee jingle on a xylophone in the basement of his Northeast Philly home.

At other points in life, Allyn has been a staff reporter at Nashville Public Radio and daily newspapers including The Oregonian in Portland and The Tennessean in Nashville. His work has also appeared in BuzzFeed News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

A native of Wilkes-Barre, a former mining town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Allyn is the son of a machinist and a church organist. He's a dedicated bike commuter and long-distance runner. He is a graduate of American University in Washington.

SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

Millions of people glue themselves to their various screens to play the video game Fortnite for hours on end. But right now, many cannot play on their mobile phones. That's because of a legal battle between the maker of Fortnite, Epic Games, and the platforms where you download the game, namely Apple and Google's app stores. The CEO of Epic hasn't explained what's behind his lawsuit until now. Here's NPR's Bobby Allyn.

Kristie Hunter is a former public school teacher who for the past two years has made most of her money teaching children in China how to speak English online.

"I've been a stay-at-home mom with our three children, and as they were getting older, I missed the professional side of my life," said Hunter, 42, who lives in the Columbia, South Carolina area. "So this has helped me reconnect with my career and have flexibility."

Facebook and Twitter said Tuesday that they had removed accounts linked to Russian state actors who tried to spread false stories about racial justice, the Democratic presidential campaign of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris and President Trump's policies.

Patrick Ryan is sitting on a couch in the garage of his house in California's San Mateo County. Dressed in aviator-style glasses and cowboy boots, he talks intensely about his job as a technical manager at TikTok —a job that politicians in Washington have put at risk.

The hugely popular fantasy battle game Fortnite is releasing its latest version on Thursday, but gamers hoping to play the new season on iPhones, iPads or Mac computers will be locked out.

Because of a high-stakes legal dispute between Fortnite maker Epic Games and Apple over the tech giant's 30% commission on app purchases, Fortnite's 350 million registered players will not be able to access new versions of the game on any Apple product.

Gamers can play the new version on consoles like Xbox, Nintendo, PlayStation and PC computers.

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